In Fall 2012

The H.L. Hunley, raised from the mouth of Charleston Harbor in 2000, was the first submarine to sink a ship in combat. To guide conservation, archaeologists used 3-D scanning technology to document the Hunley and its artifacts, measuring differences in surface topography to a fraction of a millimeter. Digital rendering by Benjamin Rennison and Michael Scafuri. Image provided by Friends of the Hunley


zoom in

Probing the upper atmosphere, lighter but stronger cars, blood pressure that mutes emotions, and bacteria with expensive taste.

learning from the Hunley
Much of what we thought we knew about this famous submarine was wrong.

as close as someone you care about
Sometimes cancer cells turn normal. How do they get the message?

the cabinet of curiosity
An artist contends with dynamics of family, technology, and land.

material advantage and the power of light
From cancer treatment to missile defense, science has seen the light.

genetics and the coat of many colors
With the right genes, a dog can be healthy and beautiful.

quantum heretic
Over a cup of tea, a physicist bucks conventional wisdom.

rooms for getting better
An architect helps reinvent spaces for healing.

forest by nature
Seeing the forest, the trees, and the changes to come.

close focus
In the ruins of Jewish buildings, remnants of a culture, and a writer who does not flinch from hurt feelings or her own singularity.

zoom out
Visual vitality and the grocery-cart corral.